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Hey fellow Q'ers... what tips, tricks and techniques do you all recommend for getting more of a smoke flavor and better smoke ring on your meat?
I currently tend to/like to use a combo of apple/hickory wood chunks w/my pork and chicken. I generally will go 2/3 apple 1/3 hickory... sometimes 1/2 and half. I've been to Pat's BBQ a few times now and in my opinion he's got it down pat... no pun intended. His ribs consistently have a great bark and solid smoke flavor w/very distinctive smoke ring on everything they make.
(01-31-2013 11:15 AM)rock-witchu bbq Wrote: [ -> ]Hey fellow Q'ers... what tips, tricks and techniques do you all recommend for getting more of a smoke flavor and better smoke ring on your meat?
I currently tend to/like to use a combo of apple/hickory wood chunks w/my pork and chicken. I generally will go 2/3 apple 1/3 hickory... sometimes 1/2 and half. I've been to Pat's BBQ a few times now and in my opinion he's got it down pat... no pun intended. His ribs consistently have a great bark and solid smoke flavor w/very distinctive smoke ring on everything they make.

I'm still new to smoking meat but get to it as much as possible. From everything that I have read, and from my own limited expierence, The best way to get the smoke in the meat and for a defined ring is to set it and for get it. The meat absorbes the smoke during the first couple of hours so during that time I never open the lid to the smoker. Also, I never add the wood to the smoker until the temperature is right and the meat is room temp. I usually get a great smoke ring and the smokey flavour we're all trying for. If there's more to it than this, I'm interested in knowing as well.
I have used Apple and Hickory in the past but I have had the best results with a Post Oak / Cherry mix. I use the Cherry/Oak Combo on the large meat cuts during the 1st half of my smoking time. In my opinion, the large cuts don't take or need more smoke after 4 to 5 hours... It can make your bark to dark.

Clear to blue smoke gives the best flavor... Not billowing white!
The Smoke ring is a chemical reaction between the nitrites and nitrates in the smoke and the myoglobin in the meat, the reaction stops taking place somewhere in the 135 - 140° range, so if you wait to put your meat on until it is at room temperature, you cut the chemical reaction time from 40° to 140° to 65° to 140° that's a 25% reduction in smokering, all other factors remaining the same!

Meat will take smoke until you take it off the pit, but as Jesse said 4 or 5 hours and good color is a good place to wrap, (if that's your choice), but with good clean fire you don't really over smoke the meat, so those that want to cook without wrapping can go that way instead!
Here you go: liquid smoke and a food safe red water color marker for smoke ring. Hey....who's going to know.
If you want more smoke flavor up the Hickory, oak or pecan (strong woods) if you don't like the smoke as much or want it sweeter use more apple, peach, or cherry. Keep in mind that you should almost never see the smoke unless you look for it. After 6 or 7 hours with a butt in there you will still have plenty of smoke. After you figure out your mix you can save a lot on foil Tongue
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