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Low & Slow??... - Guest - 03-01-2009 12:06 PM

In case any of you have ever wondered why in BBQ we talk about "low & slow" - and what is happening to meats during this process - I have posted an article that covers the subject in some detail... CLICK HERE to view...


Hoochie


Re: Low & Slow??... - Guest - 03-01-2009 11:51 PM

Nice post, Dr. Mike. I understand the chemistry, but the success of hot & fast cooking leaves me baffled.

Keep it coming, brother!

John


Re: Low & Slow??... - Swine Steward - 03-02-2009 02:32 AM

I see you are spreading the word of BBQ to the masses. Excellent article Mr. HQ.


- bbqguy123 - 03-02-2009 08:04 AM

PatioDaddio;p="14319 Wrote:Nice post, Dr. Mike. I understand the chemistry, but the success of hot & fast cooking leaves me baffled.

Keep it coming, brother!

John

I found this: "The two most often used meat-tenderizing enzymes are papain and bromelain. They make up roughly about 95% of meat-tenderizers. The specific substrates these enzymes work on are complex proteins found in meat called collagen and elastin." Ref... Enzymes in Meat Tenderization By: Sayhee Cook

Is that why most inject before a fast cook?

Sheldon


Re: Low & Slow??... - BBQSki - 03-02-2009 08:23 AM

There's an old book out there called Barbecue and Sausage Making Secrets by Charles Knote -- goes into great detail about the chemical processes and the like. I think you can still get it at the KCBS books section in the Bullsheet. The recipes aren't all that good in it, but the science of the book is well done.

Low and slow vs. fast and furious: One thing that most books don't discuss is the concept of convection. The more air you have moving through your pit, and the longer amount of time you have the meat in the pit, the faster the meat will dry out. You can cook at 160 (right where everything breaks down) for 48 hours, but I would suspect that your meat would be dry. Its all about striking a balance between time in the pit versus higher temperature.


- Guest - 03-02-2009 09:35 AM

bbqguy123;p="14328 Wrote:I found this: "The two most often used meat-tenderizing enzymes are papain and bromelain. They make up roughly about 95% of meat-tenderizers. The specific substrates these enzymes work on are complex proteins found in meat called collagen and elastin." Ref... Enzymes in Meat Tenderization By: Sayhee Cook

Is that why most inject before a fast cook?

Sheldon

Hey, Sheldon...

In the class I recently took down in Austin recently, Johnny Trigg was the "hot & fast" cook - but he didn't inject... On the other hand, Rod Gray injected - but he was more of a "low & slow" cook... So - I don't know if that is solely the reason why cooks are injecting or not... Rod talked about doing it more to add flavor/moisture than anything else...

Hoochie


Re: Low & Slow??... - Guest - 03-02-2009 11:56 AM

PatioDaddio;p="14319 Wrote:Nice post, Dr. Mike. I understand the chemistry, but the success of hot & fast cooking leaves me baffled.

Keep it coming, brother!

John

Patience, my brother... Patience... :wink:

I anticipated a comment along your line of thought... And I am awaiting some feedback from a couple of a meat science professors at a couple of major universities down in Texas to get their take as to how/why "hot & fast" may also be a viable option when it comes to Que... There are definitely some great cooks out there doing well with "hot & fast" these days... But there are definitely those doing well with "low and slow", too...

My article was meant to be a "baseline" for the readers... A place we can go from... "Low & slow" is without a doubt the more "traditional" and time-tested method for cooking Que... And it definitely works...

But I am going to also examine "hot & fast" for the readers as well... I am just awaiting some insight/information from some folks who hopefully are a whole lot smarter than me in this area... Being the knot-head that I am, I am afraid all that I have to offer at this time is my own casual observations on the subject...

At the same time, does that mean that a "scientific" answer will resolve the issue of "low & slow" versus "hot & fast"? I doubt it... Like the "stick burner vs pellet pooper" argument, I have a feeling that smokeheads are still going to line up on one side of the line or the other in this matter as well :shock: :lol:

Hoochie