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Any suggestions to smoke a goose? - Infamous Dave - 11-28-2007 10:37 AM

Has anyone smoked a goose before? Do I need to do anything different then what I would do with Turkey? If anyone has any pointers, I would love to read them.
Thanks


Re: Any suggestions to smoke a goose? - SoEzzy - 11-28-2007 06:27 PM

I've cooked lots of farmed goose and duck over the years, and only a handful of wild birds, but in ovens not smokers.

To oven cook either, I put then on a cooling rack in a pan, so they don't stand in their own grease, (and there is going to be more grease than you can believe could possibly come out of that sized domestically reared bird).

Cooking them at 325 -350, prick them under the wings and over the breast area to allow any fat to run out. For wild birds, they don't have as heavy a fat layer, and I would think about either brining them or repeatedly basting them, covering them with bacon etc.

Cook them to temperature rather than time.

(((With farmed fowl cook them for 30 minutes, then start checking on them every 15 minutes, each time you check lift out the cooling rack or hold a towel tight to keep the bird in place, while you pour out and save the accumulated fat, keep checking them every 15 minutes, repeating the fat removal, when the bird has gone 15 minutes without producing more fat in the pan, your goose is cooked.)))

With wild birds cook for 30 minutes, then start checking every 15 minutes, each time you check lift out the cooling rack or hold a towel tight to keep the bird in place, while you pour out and save the accumulated fat, keep checking them every 15 minutes, repeating the fat removal, when the bird has gone 15 minutes without producing more fat in the pan, your goose is not yet cooked, (as a wild bird it had a lat less fat than a farmed bird), take the collected fat and baste the bird in it's own fat, then put it back for another 10 minutes, you may need to do these 10 minute bastes 2 or 3 times, check for internal temperature, I like to aim for 170 F, (final internal temperature), so you will want to take it off at 160 F +, and let it finish under a foil tent, so it will peak about 170 F ish!


Rest them 25 - 30 minutes, carve and serve.

If you are going to rotisserie them, keep a drip pan underneath and collect the fat, at 30, 45 & 60 minutes, at this point your wild birds may have run out of grease, begin basting and drop from 15 minute checks to 10 minute checks with additional basting.


Re: Any suggestions to smoke a goose? - Infamous Dave - 11-29-2007 08:34 AM

Thanks for the suggestions...
I should have specified, we are doing a Christmas party and will be smoking Turkey, Ribs and Brisket. I just thought it would be fun to have a Christmas Goose, just to say we had one. So the one we do will be purchased from a butcher (farm grown, I would think).


- SoEzzy - 11-29-2007 10:34 AM

With a farmed Goose make sure it is well pricked from under the wings to across the breast and belly, then cook for 30 - 45 minutes, then drain the grease, continue to drain the grease off every 15 minutes until it produces no additional grease in the pan.

Voila! Your Goose is now cooked, stab it with a thermometer just to be sure, 165 -175 F internal should be good, though I have seen folks who still say 180 F this makes it too dry in my book.

Once the goose stops dripping into the pan in that last 15 minutes of cooking, the meat will be moist but not wet, loosely tent it with foil when you allow it to rest.


Re: Any suggestions to smoke a goose? - elkski - 12-05-2007 08:09 AM

I have two wild plucked ducks... I want to smoke them. A guy told me he brines them overnight and then smokes 4-8 ducks at 225 for 4 hours...

What is a good brine solution... It does seem that I will have to brown off the skin as I have cooked them in the oven before and there is some grease and you want that skin crisp.

Also why do you say to drian off the grease?? is it so it wont splatter inside your oven?? or catch fire??? I am not a cook but so many times in directions and or recipes they say things and if they gave a reason it would teach me something.


Re: Any suggestions to smoke a goose? - SoEzzy - 12-05-2007 09:08 AM

A farmed fowl is a totally different beast than wild fowl, farmed is SO full of grease that if you just leave it to drip you'll need to either put the fire out in the bottom of your oven, or you'll have a house full of smoke.

By putting the goose / duck on a cooling rack in a pan, you get to capture all those good flavor full fats, there are many things you can keep goose / duck grease for adding back to, though if you were cooking three or four a week, I wold probably start throwing it out as there will be way more grease than you can use.

The other reason to use this method is that in a farmed bird it is as accurate a method of telling if you bird is cooked as I know, way more accurate than using a thermometer and not knowing exactly what temperature you are aiming for in what part of the bird, (breast, thigh etc).

With wild birds they contain way less fat, having them on the rack in the pan allows you to baste them once they have stopped giving grease, and the baste doesn't disappear, it too drains from around the bird and ends up in the pan gaining a smoky flavor that you can suck back up with a baster and baste the birds with again.