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Dutch Oven Problems
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Tour de Que Offline
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Post: #1
Dutch Oven Problems
I know ... I know ... this is a BBQ website. But, there seem to be a lot of dutch oven experts here, so I thought I'd give it a try:

I am having a dutch oven problem. My grandfather died a few years ago and I inherited his old dutch oven and 10" chicken frier. It was pretty clear that I grandfather didn't take care of these cast iron beauties as they came to me covered in rust and gunk. My problem is that I just can't seem to get them clean. Is there any way that a regular joe without special tools can get this stuff off??? Your guidance in this time of darkness will be greatly appreciated.

TDQ
06-05-2008 08:09 AM
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Infamous Dave Offline
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Post: #2
 
I'm not an expert in dutch ovens, but I knew someone who acquired some very used dutch ovens that were also covered in rust and such. As a last ditch effort he had someone sand blast them, it got rid of all of the rust and other crap. He then seasoned them 3 or 4 times then he broke them in with foods high in greese (ie bacon) today they are black and work great.

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06-05-2008 08:56 AM
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wallywombat Offline
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Post: #3
Re: Dutch Oven Problems
asked a friend how he has cleaned up rust off of a old dutch oven he had and he pointed me to the following:

<!-- m --><a class="postlink" href="http://papadutch.home.comcast.net/~papadutch/dutch-oven-care.htm#Strip">http://papadutch.home.comcast.net/~papa ... .htm#Strip</a><!-- m -->

If you are the adventurous type you can try the Electrolysis method they link too....
06-05-2008 09:25 AM
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Larry Jacobs Offline
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Post: #4
Re: Dutch Oven Problems
Here's what I've done to all my ovens I've restored (about 30). Get a large enough plastic bucket like the muck buckets that will let you submerge the Dutch oven completely. Put your oven in bucket, add enough water to cover. Mix in one quart of apple cider vinegar. Then stir in one large hand full of dried alfalfa leaves and stems. You can buy it at Pet Smart or IFA (rabbit food).
Mix that up and let your iron soak for a couple hours. Using a stiff brush, the rust will now clean off the metal easily. Rinse in warm water and dry quickly. You now have raw cast iron and it will start rusting in minutes if you don't season fast.
Using Crisco shortening or Campchef cast iron conditioner, (no veg. oil, lard, etc.) rub in a thin coat anywhere you don't want rust which should be everywhere except bail handle. Place in home oven upside down with lid right side up on top. Bake at 400 degrees for two hours. It will smoke so do it with doors open or in BBQ. Repeat for darker thicker seasoning.
For more info, check the International Dutch Oven society web site at:
<!-- w --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.idos.org">www.idos.org</a><!-- w -->
06-05-2008 10:48 AM
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Gene Offline
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Post: #5
Re: Dutch Oven Problems
A wire wheel on a drill or a small grinder works fast. Don't heat them in the house. You'll have every smoke detector in the house going off. Use the gas grill outside. That's what they were made for anyway. A lot of times just a good burn will do the trick also. A very hot gas grill will take off all the old seasoning about as well as anything. A 400-500 degree grill temp is easy to attain. I have used veg oil for years and other than an occasional over dose where it can go rancid, I've never had problems. Check out <!-- w --><a class="postlink" href="http://www.lodgemfg.com">www.lodgemfg.com</a><!-- w --> for more seasoning info. They have been going dutch since b/4 I or even Cyclops was born.

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06-05-2008 12:46 PM
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SoEzzy Offline
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Post: #6
 
I got a couple of cast iron pans from a family friend two years ago, I used the Coke method to get the rust and junk off, putting them in a bus tray and covering them with coke a cola, leave them in 24 hours, when they come out wash them off with clean water, all the rust and junk came right off.

Heat them in the oven and re-season them to your taste.

I like to heat them first, then oil them well and heat them again.

Respice, adspice, prospice. Latin proverb.
Respice = you didn't use enough spice the first time! adspice = you ought to add spice, you know? prospice = you should be an advocate for spice!
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06-05-2008 12:55 PM
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Tour de Que Offline
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Post: #7
Re: Dutch Oven Problems
I did the clean cycle in the oven thing and it seemed to anger the metal. It came out a complete post of rust ... I am going to try some of these this weekend. Thanks.
06-05-2008 05:05 PM
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