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Smoking a turkey
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BBQMama Offline
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Post: #1
Smoking a turkey
I want to try smoking a turkey this year. Can anybody give me some information about how long I should allow for it to cook? Probably looking at about a 10 - 12# bird.

Wow, it's nice to have this group of brains to pick!! Big Grin
11-11-2006 11:03 AM
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Rodney Offline
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Post: #2
 
I can let you know tomorrow night, Joe and I are are doing a few turkeys tomorrow.

"It is better to have burnt and lost, then never to have barbecued at all" - William Shakespeare
11-11-2006 02:26 PM
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BBQMama Offline
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Post: #3
 
Thanks, Rodney ... appreciate any insight you can provide. You two sure you don't need anyone to help sample that practice cooking? :wink:
11-11-2006 03:27 PM
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no1plumber Offline
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Post: #4
Smoked turkey
A smoked turkey is a great way to celebrate Thanksgiving.
I've been smoking a Thanksgiving turkey every year now for the past 4 to 5 years. Everyone loves it. I use a traeger smoker but I wouldn't think it would be much different in another kind of smoker.
Place the seasoned turkey in the smoker and smoke for 6 to 8 hr. Then turn up the heat and raise the turkey temp up to 170 degrees. Its that easy. I don't recommend placeing stuffing in bird. The low temps of smoking can cause problems. Enjoy
11-11-2006 04:14 PM
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PackerBacker Offline
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Post: #5
 
I agree, no stuffing. The mistake I have made was cooking to large a bird, it came out ok as far as taste and tenderness, but looked a bit on the burnt side. That was because it was a 22lbs bird, and it was to close to the lid of my WSM.

DAVE

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11-11-2006 09:21 PM
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Rodney Offline
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Post: #6
 
Carla,
We cooked 4 birds all between 11-12lbs. 3 of them were pulled off between 4 to 4 1/2 hours and the 4th we pulled about an hour later. We kept the temp between 240 and 255 with one spike to 275 for a couple minutes only. Hope this helps out!

"It is better to have burnt and lost, then never to have barbecued at all" - William Shakespeare
11-12-2006 04:32 PM
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BBQMama Offline
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Post: #7
 
Thanks Rodney! I'll let you know how mine turns out.
11-12-2006 06:11 PM
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T Offline
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Post: #8
 
Yo Carla, I have done a few Turkeys in my days and I have found that if you go with internal temperature, whatever the weight, done is done and you can't go wrong. There are too may variables to go with an exact time. Time for me, I use it as some sort of a meter to check for internal temp. This is my own opinion, and this has worked best for me over the years. Stopped by to see Joe and Rodney today, and they did a great job with the turkeys. Had a sample of one of the turkeys and some of the sausage cook today. Turkey was moist and not dried out with good injection flavor, sausage was great with a piece of white bread and mustard. Joe's cooker can handle a nice amount of food. Sitting there with those two got me fired up to cook, but by the time I got back to the house I had to practice a clean burn in my fireplace, because it was "GAME TIME" don't start Dave and you either Gene!

keep it low-n-slow " T "

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11-12-2006 10:10 PM
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Gumbo Offline
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Post: #9
 
First, brine, then air dry in fridge. Smoke it hot at no less than 300 deg for crispy skin. I cook to 165 internal.

If you haven't done one, make a trial run this week with a small bird.
11-13-2006 09:09 AM
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Post: #10
 
I have heard that Butterball turkeys do some sort of "brining" with their birds... So you might want to look into that before doing a full-blown brine on that brand in particular... Anyone else know anything more about Butterball turkeys as such?

Definitely don't smoke with stuffing inside (can get you quite sick...)
11-13-2006 11:05 AM
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Post: #11
smoked turkey....
you got to brine it....gallon water, 1 cup of salt, one cup brown sugar and a can of pepsi or coke...brine over night.....cook at 250 until internal temp is 170 and remove..... enjoy.....
11-13-2006 01:54 PM
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Gene Offline
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Post: #12
Smoked turkey
From what they say @ bbqbook.com Butterballs are "deep basted" what ever that means and 4-41/2 hrs. to done. But I agree with "T" temperature is the all important thing here. I agree with "T" there but not football. Sorry "T" ol buddy, just had to inject that. How 'bout them Broncos!!
Gene
(The "Pack is Back") yesterday anyway.
11-13-2006 06:47 PM
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Pegleg Offline
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Post: #13
 
Carla,

Here is the brine recipie we use every time we cook big bird. Adjust the recipie if you use more or less water. This came from BBQSEARCH.COM in the FAQ section. A friend used this the other day, and used rootbeer because he didn't have any ginger ale, it was pretty tasty. I also add a tablespoon or two of tenderquick as well. I drop the bird in a bucket for a couple of days shaking it a couple of times during the process. Come smoking time, pull the bird out and rinse it off in cold water, If it's not rinsed off it will taste pretty salty. We've tried other brines and this by far is the family favorite.

Enjoy!!

Lyle

Dan Gill's Turkey Brine

1 gallon cold water add
1 1/2 cups salt* (I use kosher salt)
1/2 cup molasses
1 1/2 tablespoon garlic or garlic powder crushed or minced
1/2 tablespoon onion powder
1/4 cup black pepper
1/2 cup lemon juice
1/2 ounce maple flavoring
12 ounces ginger ale
11-13-2006 07:52 PM
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PackerBacker Offline
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Post: #14
Re: Smoked turkey
Gene Wrote:From what they say @ bbqbook.com Butterballs are "deep basted" what ever that means and 4-41/2 hrs. to done. But I agree with "T" temperature is the all important thing here. I agree with "T" there but not football. Sorry "T" ol buddy, just had to inject that. How 'bout them Broncos!!
Gene
(The "Pack is Back") yesterday anyway.

OH Baby!! I had two birds on the WSM, and a cold adult bev. and life was good on sunday! The Packers still have a chance, I like underdogs!!!

So.... T, what happened to the BLACK&SILVER??????

DAVE (PACKERBACKER) :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol: :lo

PACKERBACKER BBQ TEAM
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"Wait until Next Year"
And yes... I hate Brett Favre
11-13-2006 08:16 PM
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BBQMama Offline
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Post: #15
 
Thanks Lyle and Gary! I'm getting hungry already. I sure appreciate all the help and suggestions.
11-13-2006 08:43 PM
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Gumbo Offline
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Post: #16
 
Hey Hooch,

Yes, Butterballs are brined or otherwise enhanced. But I try to buy fresh birds each year. There's nothing like a fresh bird. Costco always carries some good, fresh, non-enhanced birds. I prefer to brine them myself so I can control the ingredients and flavors that go in them.

I figure if I'm going to go through all that work, I might as well use the best ingredients--including the turkey itself.
11-14-2006 08:17 AM
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BBQUte Offline
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Post: #17
More brining info
Can't seem to locate my FAVORITE brining 101 file from Cooks Illustrated, but, this web page has some great info. About 3 years ago I smoked 15 turkeys for friends and family for Christmas gifts. Carla, If you want the Cook's article I can email it to you. send me a message at
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http://www.cookshack.com/barbeque_guide/...ing101.htm
11-14-2006 01:52 PM
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Gumbo Offline
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Post: #18
 
BBQUte, I used that brine last year--turned out one great tasting and moist bird. That link also has the recipe to Shake's Honey Brine--another popular recipe.
11-15-2006 08:43 AM
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Tuff Offline
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Post: #19
 
So lets hear it guys, how do you smoke your turkeys? What size bird do you use? How long do you leave it in? What Temp do you smoke it with? Apple, Cherry, Hickory.....etc......?
:?:
11-16-2006 02:15 PM
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Gumbo Offline
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Post: #20
 
Hey Turk, everything I read says to use smaller birds in the 12-14 pound range. The reason is that big birds can stay in the danger zone too long if cooking on low temp.

I like to cook mine hot--at least 300 deg. I have kids who like the skin, so I need it crispy. Don't cook it by time, but go by temp. 165 is done and leaves a very moist bird.

Wood: anything mild. Fruit wood is great.
11-17-2006 08:52 AM
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Pegleg Offline
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Post: #21
 
Turk,

I always cook at least a 20 pound bird, this year it's a 22 pounder, for me the bigger the better. When I brine though I ALWAYS use tenderquick, I have read that it contains nitrites helps kill any rouge bacteria that might still be hanging around. Anyone's thoughts on this? I always cook the bird at a higher temperature, at least 300 deg and always use cherry wood.

Lyle Earl
KCBS Certified Judge
Never be afraid to try something new. Remember, amateurs built the Ark ---- professionals built the Titanic.
11-19-2006 09:18 AM
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