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To wrap or not to wrap
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BBQMama Offline
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Post: #1
To wrap or not to wrap
When wrapping a butt or a brisket I've seen folks just wrap in foil, or wrap in plastic wrap first, then foil. Are there any benefits to one over the other? Just wondering why the plastic wrap would be used. Is there a possibility of an interaction between the foil and the spices? Just to get a softer bark?

Any information, recommendations, techniques would be appreciated.
08-24-2006 10:42 AM
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Gumbo Offline
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Post: #2
 
Most wrap in foil during the rest period. Some wrap during the latter part of the cook for various reasions (moisture retention, reduce cooking time, reduce smoke absorption, tenderize, etc). Although the use of foil is looked down on in many BBQ circles, many winning comp cooks still wrap during part of the cook.

A lot of people feel that cooking with aluminun foil increases the risk of alzheimers. Also, no matter how carefully you wrap a piece of meat in foil, it always seems to leak--even if you use HD foil. Plastic wrap solves both issues. Plastic wrap or film has a melting point above 300 deg, and it tends to stretch over bones rather than puncture.

I buy the big, wide, huge rolls from Costco of plastic film and HD foil.
08-25-2006 08:23 AM
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Pegleg Offline
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Post: #3
 
During the Certified BBQ judging class last thursday Ed Roith referred to foiled brisket as having a "pot roast flavor", he said the moisture would be drawn out from the brisket after it was wrapped. I later asked him what happens when you foil it, he said to try it and see. In cooking for co-workers I would put several layers of foil on the briskets in the morining before going to work and toss them in a cooler. When I pulled them out at noon they were still too hot to handle and were jucy and flavorful -- at least I thought they were. Your thoughts?

Lyle Earl
08-27-2006 08:34 AM
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BBQMama Offline
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Post: #4
 
Well ... at the State Championship this weekend I tried foiling my briskets after cooking and letting them rest for about an hour. Definitely kept the moisture in and we ended up placing 7th in brisket ... so I guess it's something I'm going to keep working on.
08-27-2006 10:08 AM
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SmokinJoe Offline
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Post: #5
 
When wrapping, I've used plastic wrap before cooking, only. I'll do it after applying the rub, then wrap in foil afterward. I haven't done this for any other purpose other than to help keep the aroma down while storing in the family fridge.

After cooking, however, I've only used foil - never plastic wrap. During and after cooking, I want a little bit of moisture to vent. Otherwise I'm steaming the meat, and I've not been a fan of steamed meat jello. Don't like what it does to the texture.

-joe

Get your smoke on...
08-28-2006 05:43 AM
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